Four Questions for the Writing Process Blog Hop

A special thank you to Shelina from “A Writer Inspired” for inviting me to participate in “The Writer’s Blog Tour” or “The Writing Process Blog Hop,” whichever name you prefer.  Shelina’s blog has become one of my favorites, doling out writing advice with a quirky sense of humor.  Also, please check out Shelina’s short story series, “Ava’s Interpreter Diaries.”  I promise once you start reading, you won’t be able to stop!

The Writing Process Blog Hop is all about getting inside the heads of our fellow writers to find out what makes them tick.  This is accomplished using four seemingly straightforward questions.  So without further ado, here are my answers.

1. What are you currently working on?

In July of 2013, I dropped from a full time job to part time employment in order to focus more on my writing.  The transition has been much more complicated than I expected, and it’s taken me almost a full year to get my head straight.  Right now, I’m working on Tomorrow News Network, Volume One, an anthology of the T.N.N. stories from 2012.  Each story has to be polished and re-edited, and I’m also writing ten brief bonus stories to help tie the original stories together.  The final product should be available through Amazon Kindle and CreateSpace by the end of this year.

2. How does your work differ from others in its genre?

The Tomorrow News Network series revolves around one central character: Talie Tappler.  What’s different about her is that she’s not the protagonist.  She’s not the antagonist either.  Talie is a journalist who travels through time, arriving at newsworthy catastrophes before they take place.  She never lifts a finger to help anyone, but she also has a way of passively allowing the bad guys to get what’s coming to them.  At best, we could call Talie morally ambiguous, and I think that’s what keeps people coming back to read more about her.  As one of my readers told me, Talie is the kind of character we hate and love at the same time.

3. Why do you do what you do?

The answer to this is surprisingly personal.  Back in 2011, I became dangerously ill.  I won’t go into details here, but I could barely walk, I spent all my waking hours in agony, and it was a struggle to concentrate on anything for a prolonged period of time.  Yet somehow, I managed to write what became “The Medusa Effect,” the first of the Tomorrow News Network stories.  I have no medical evidence to back this up, but I believe T.N.N. saved my life.  At the very least, it gave me something to focus on to help me overcome the pain, and it gave me a little extra motivation to get better.

4. How does your writing process work?

It’s complicated.  It involves calendars and checklists and pie charts.  It involves praying the Rosary and, every once in awhile, eating a bowl of alphabet soup.  There are many weird and wacky aspects of my writing process (or “writing strategy,” as I like to call it), but here are three of the more important ones.

  • Aimless Research: I just completed a five-page outline on how the Sun works.  Nuclear fusion, the photosphere and chromosphere, the so-called “long walk” that photons take as they meander through the various layers of the Sun’s interior… it’s all in there, and I currently have no plans to ever use it for a story.  Instead, I wrote this outline as part of my ongoing self-education in science.  I want to ensure that I’m as familiar with as broad a range of scientific knowledge as possible so that if something like the “long walk” ever does come up in one of my stories, I’ll already feel comfortable writing about it.
  • Word Hunting: Sitting down in front of a blank page can be intimidating, so instead, I curl up with a dictionary and/or thesaurus and start hunting for interesting or unusual words.  I often search for words related to a specific concept, something relevant to the scene or story I intend to write, and then start compiling a vocabulary list.  Soon, without even meaning to, I start stringing phrases together, then complete sentences, and before I know it, I’ve got several chunks of my story scribbled down on bits of scrap paper and the backs of old envelopes.
  • Editing with Friends: A lot of writers will tell you that writing is an inherently solitary activity, but it doesn’t have to be that way.  A tradition has evolved among myself and a handful of close friends.  Whenever I finish a story, I invite my friends over for dinner and throw an editing party.  After we eat, I read my story aloud while they follow along on hardcopies, often interrupting me with questions, comments, or suggestions.  They’ve called me out on mistakes I never would have noticed, and they’ve also praised me for stylistic devices I never realized I had used.  This is beta reading as a social activity, and the advantage is that as we go through the story I get to see in real time which parts my friends find confusing, exciting, or boring.

As part of this blog hop, I’m supposed to invite some other bloggers to participate next week.  I don’t want to put any pressure on anyone, but if these bloggers are interested, then it’ll be their turn to answer four questions on Monday, May 26th.  And if they don’t, then I still get to post links to their amazing blogs.

  • Soliloquies: a gentle mixture of writing and philosophy from Michelle Joelle.  Ever since I discovered this blog, I have had a lot to think about (especially after our comment thread last month on modern day slavery).  Click here to visit Soliloquies.
  • Planetary Defense Command: a blog about defending the Earth from poorly written Sci-Fi novels.  The illustrious commander of our planetary defense force has turned book reviews into a whole new art form.  Click here to check out our planet’s defenses.
  • Linda Frindt: Linda is a good friend of mine and a regular at my editing parties.  She’s currently writing a children’s book about cats… or possibly a cats’ book about children.  I keep forgetting which.  Click here to visit Linda’s blog.
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18 thoughts on “Four Questions for the Writing Process Blog Hop

  1. I knew this was going to be good! So glad you shared. ‘Alphabet soup,’ ‘dangerously ill,’ and ‘editing parties.’ I’m learning so much. Plus, the more I learn about TNN the more I love it.

  2. I finally had the time to sit down and read through your answers, and I’m so glad you participated. I love your aimless research – that’s such a wonderful attitude to have, and I’m sure it will be a wellspring of inspiration, showing up when you least expect it. I have this voice in my head telling me to get back on track, focus on the task at hand, pick one project and see it through, but it’s when I allow myself to be aimless that I end up uncovering something cohesive I could never have carefully planned. Thank you for writing!

  3. Pingback: A Writing Process Blog Hop | Soliloquies ~ writing about writing, reality, and the narrative human experience

  4. Pingback: Writing Process Blog Hop | Planetary Defense Command

  5. Pingback: Blog Hop follow-up | Planetary Defense Command

  6. I share your love of words and research. I am amazingly motivated by reading the dictionary and the ‘aimless research’ you refer to. Often, what I find ends up in my writing.

  7. I also use a dictionary and thesaurus to find interesting words. Early on I also branched out into using the encyclopedia, which generated some poems I refer to as ‘encyclopedia poetry’.

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