Why I Wrote “The Orion War”

I was reading a Sci-Fi novel a few years ago in which a group of primitive aliens were discussing their various religious beliefs.  One of these aliens turned to the human protagonist to ask about religion on Earth.  The human responded, rather snobbishly I thought, “Oh, we outgrew that stuff.”  I’ve known more than a few people who longingly await the day when religion is tossed upon the ash heap of history, and this attitude seems to be pervasive among science fiction authors as well.  “The Orion War” is my response.

1.3 Orion War

“What good has religion ever done for us?” these anti-religious individuals might ask.  They’d then point to the Inquisition, the Crusades, and the current discord over evolution, gay marriage, and stem cell research.  They might also point to the ongoing threat of Islamic fundamentalist terrorism.  Given all the trouble religion has caused us, wouldn’t it be better to simply eliminate the whole institution?

But let me ask who would Martin Luther King have been without his faith?  Or Gandhi?  Or Nelson Mandela?  I was once an agnostic; then, I became a Christian.  Although I still remain skeptical about many details of Judeo-Christian mythology, I have found a deep sense of peace and well being since my conversion.  Religion is not 100% good, I admit that, but it is not 100% bad either.  To think that we will simply “outgrow” it is, I believe, a narrow-minded attitude.

In “The Orion War,” I wanted to portray both sides of this debate.  The story is set in the distant future at a time when religion is outlawed.  The process of hunting down and uprooting secret religious communities has turned into a new Inquisition almost as ugly as the one once conducted by the Catholic Church.  But by the end, the persecuted Community of Christ is not without sin.  Though they start off with the best of intentions, these exiled Christians soon turn violent, waging a holy war for control of the Orion Nebula.

Today, I am posting the latest revisions to “The Orion War.”  I wanted to slow the pace of the story just a bit to give it some room to breathe.  Never before nor since have I written a short story on such an epic scale (with the possible exception of “The Wrong Future”).  I hope you will find the new version to feel less rushed and less hectic than the original.

Click here to start reading “The Orion War,” and please let me know what you think in the comments below.

Revisions

1.1 Medusa Effect

It’s been a while since I updated anything on the Tomorrow News Network website.  I’ve been neck-deep in revisions of the 2012 stories for the last few months.  When I started writing T.N.N. over two years ago, I was very much a novice.  I’m not going to claim that I have since mastered the art of writing, but I am far more competent at my craft than I used to be.

I have also started working with an editor who has taught me the difference between “borders” versus “boarders,” “prescribed” versus “proscribed,” and “farther” versus “further.”  My editor has also called my attention to a number of other embarrassing errors that I am now in the process of fixing.

Today, I am happy to announce that the revised versions of the first two Tomorrow News Network stories are available here on the T.N.N. website.  Revisions of the third story are coming soon.  In fact, I had a meeting with my editor today concerning story #3, “The Orion War,” and she tells me that the updated version is much stronger than the original.

1.2 99 White Balloons

For those of you who’ve read these stories before, I hope you’ll take the time to read them again and see how they’ve improved.  And if you’re new to T.N.N., I beg your indulgence as this revision process goes forward.  Any typos or grammatical errors you find will be corrected in due time (probably).

Please click here to start reading the new version of “The Medusa Effect,” the “pilot episode” of the series.  Click here to read the new “99 White Balloons,” which focuses on the true story of Roswell.